#WednesdayWisdom, #WordlessWednesday

Farm to Table: #WordlessWednesday #WednesdayWisdom

“Let things taste the way they are.”

– Alice Waters, chef, author, and owner of Chez Panisse

 

 

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Our modest fresh food produce this morning

FARM TO TABLE

 

We live in an apartment, but fortunately for us we have balconies and a terrace space that has given us the wonderful option to grow our own farm to table produce. Herbs like basil, mint, parsley, oregano and others like lettuce, kale, pak choy, celery, spinach, fenugreek, rocket leaves, tomatoes, lime etc. Especially when they are in season. 

Of course not enough to supplement our meals, but farm fresh produce to look forward too. All grown organically using naturally, composted manure. No chemicals added at all. 

We have enough basil to last us through the year and I love the fact that it multiples so rapidly. The rest are fairy seasonal. 

That’s our harvest from this morning. We are thrilled to finally be able to grow strawberries, after a few failed attempts.

We now await the little black grapes, the runner and French beans, the pumpkin flowers (for pakoras/fritters) if not the fruit. And more aubergines. I’m look forward to turning the flourishing summer basil into pesto.

The summers are harsh in India. Therefore the plants tend to take a beating and the harvest does taper off.

But yet, again the weather transits and we will have these glorious babies back. 🙂

Nothing beats farm to table, believe you me!

 

On a side note:  I recently did an energy workshop and I learnt the importance of giving gratitude to the plants around us. I knew how plants benefit by being spoken to, but this workshop gave me the motivation to actualise this practise.

I have started having animated conversations with my plants these days. And yes they do respond!

Call me trippy, but it works wonders.

There is also enough research to prove that talking to plants gives them the much needed impetus to grow. Plants even respond to music.

How many of you talk to your plants?

 

 

 

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#WordlessWednesday hosted by Esha and yours truly is a weekly blog hop.

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Care to join in ? Here’s how you can:

  1. Post a picture on your blog. It could be from life’s wondrous or wicked moments, your wanderlust days, or simple random shots that caught your fancy, or not. 
  2. And make your post as wordless or wordy as you wish to. Well, we are guessing  now you know why we sometimes call ourselves “not-so-wordless Wednesday” too! 
  3. Add our badge to your post and a backlink to our posts.
  4. We’d love you to read, comment and share the posts linked here and connect with some fascinating bloggers. 

Our linky stays live till Monday. So you have ample time to create a post and hop in. 

Get ready to be deliciously framed!

Have a gratifying #WW! 

 

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Linking up with a bunch of fantastic peeps from blogosphere who host #WordlessWednesday

 Cathy Kennedy,  Betty, Steve, Sandee, image-in-ing, Zina , Jeanne Xmas Dolly

 

This post also links to #Skywatch Friday, beautiful sky shots from different parts of the world.

 

You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!

Click here to enter


44 thoughts on “Farm to Table: #WordlessWednesday #WednesdayWisdom

    1. Oh! Tell me about it Margy. Have grown in a sprawling University campus where we ate farm fresh food plucked from our gardens.

      Thank you so much for hopping by.

  1. “Let things taste the way they are”……….. purrrrfect quote!
    The produce are fresh and a gift from the plants for all the TLC they get.

    I am trying to grow lime. Keeping my fingers crossed. I love growing fenugreek in winters and some spring onions and garlic for their fresh leaves.

    You did a fantastic job with the strawberry plant. They need a lot of attention and care. Pat your back 🙂

    Oh yes I do talk to plants…. birds…… 🙂

    1. Thanks for your kind words, Monika. 🙂 Pat on the DH’s back. He worked pretty hard on the strawberries, saving them from the pigeons too! 🙂

      You are quite a poet yourself. I hope you write poetry too?

  2. They look super fresh, Natasha. Your plants are definitely responding to your conversations positively. Terrace farming proves that we don’t need a whole lot of space to grow our own vegetables.

  3. Every plant I tried growing on my balcony died! I’ve always wanted a little herb garden I can go to when I just want a sprig of curry leaves instead of going out all the way to the grocer’s. Your little “farm” looks good! I wouldn’t have guessed the produce was from your balcony!

    Happy Weds, Natasha!

    1. Thanks Veronica. One piece of advice, may I? Don’t tell yourself they will die, this time. Just affirm they will last. Also try growing curry leaves. They grow well, with some left over tea leaves as manure. 🙂

      1. My periwinkle died today! I think it’s my balcony – it doesn’t have good shade and it always gets either too hot or too windy or too wet when it rains!

        I have been trying to grow plants on my balcony for 24 years!!

        Thanks for the advice, anyway!

        1. I’m so sorry to hear that, my friend.
          Wish I could help and make you feel better. <3

          Curry plant also needs a bit of shade too. Mine always died in the other balcony with lot of sunlight.

  4. Being a plant mom has helped me become a better person. It has taught me patience and helped me calm down. Plants add a sense of love and warmth to the house and I love that!

    That produce looks so good. My chillies and tomato plant is at the initial stage and growing well 🙂

    Farm to table is the best indeed!

  5. Lovely fresh food! Everything is energy so all we are connected. And the plants respond to us, without doubt. I like speak with them and I feel they are so much alive!
    I think that workshop was very interesting! There are a lot of studies about the connection with them.
    It is a fabulous subject and I enjoy finding it here.
    All the best, dear friend! Take care!

  6. I talk to the trees and bushes in the garden. Thank you for the shade and the coolness and fresh air they give us.
    And I kiss the lemon leaves and the lime leaves!

    Stay safe, Natasha!

  7. Super. A kitchen garden ensures what you eat is under your control. A good thing considering all the contamination reports in the food.

  8. So very nice. Very beautiful. All of those veggies look so yummy. I need to start doing this in my little backyard.

    Thanks for hosting and I hope that you and your family are safe and healthy.

    1. Was unable to comment on your post Patrick, so just in case you mange to see this: :-))

      Cute ones!

      The squirrel and duckies are my favourite, and yes so are the flowers!

      And what a fabulous signboard to have:
      “Goodwill and Tolerance live here”
      Especially in the modern world filled with so much angst and hatred. This is a sign of hope, that goodness never dies. :)))

      Thanks for this wonderful collection for our #WW, Patrick.

  9. The produce from your little garden looks lovely. It feels so amazing to eat something from plants that you’ve grown. Mom and I used to grow a lot of veggies together back when I was at home. Tomatoes, ash gourd, chillies, malabar spinach, ridge gourd and the list went on. And all of this in a really tiny space. I miss all of this in Bangalore. Right now I barely have space for a couple of pots in which I’m growing flowering plants. No space for more.

    And yes, I’ve always talked to my plants from the time I read something about it back when I was at school 😀

    1. Thank you for sharing your Mom’s and your time with your little kitchen garden, Reema.

      Must have been so much fun. But Banglore has some great, fresh food produce.

  10. How lucky to grow even a single tomato ! The thrill of eating your own produce is quite different. I talk to my plants too . And it does make a difference to them

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